Tag Archives: Place name

Book submission: Standard English Poems: Spenser to Tennyson

Title: Standard English Poems: Spenser to Tennyson
Author: Pancoast, Henry
Publication date: New York, 1899
Library: Sojourner Truth Library, SUNY New Paltz
Call number: PR1175 .P35
Submitted by: Nicole Short
Description:
Includes name inscription of Amy Louise Abel, 1910 graduate of Plainfield High School, NJ. Most notes presumably made by Miss Abel in pencil on blank pages at the beginning and end of the book. Most center thematically around God/religious outlooks on life. Typed insert of an Anna Bartlett Warner poem (and introduction) inside front cover dated 1915. Pages 331-357 are missing. Donated to the SUNY New Paltz library by Mr. Dubois LeFevere, a man descended from two of the French Huguenot families (both Dubois and LeFevere) that originally founded New Paltz in the 1700’s.

Book submission: The Boy Knight

Title: The Boy Knight
Author: Henty, G.A.
Publication date: 1890
Library: Texas A&M University-Evans Library
Call number: PZ 7 H4 Bo
Submitted by: Stephanie Lopez
Description:
This book is unique because it has two different sets of marginalia.
The set crossed out reads: “To Jesse, With Merry Xmas tidings. 1899. Aussie.”
The second set is: “Miss Mary Davies 84 Lippencott St. Toronto Ontario”
The address from the second set of marginalia is now a school, I cannot determine whether it is the same one but it is still furthering education.

Book submission: Mr. Midshipman easy : The travels and adventures of Monsieur Violet

Title: Mr. Midshipman easy : The travels and adventures of Monsieur Violet
Author: Marryat, Frederick
Publication date: 1896
Library: Texas A&M University-Evans Library
Call number: PR 4973 A15
Submitted by: Stephanie Lopez
Description:
“John S. Stuart
1119 Main St.
Houston, Texas”
This address no longer exists, there is now a metro road going through where this address once was.

Book submission: Grimm’s Fairy Tales

Title: Grimm’s Fairy Tales
Author: Beeson, Ernest
Publication date: 1924
Library: Texas A&M University-Evans Library
Call number: PZ 8 G882 B44
Submitted by: Stephanie Lopez
Description:
There is a sticker that states from the collection of Carroll Dee Laverty June 2006. She was a former student at Texas A&M University and has unfortunately passed. There is a marginalia that she seemed to have written. “Carroll Laverty 2525 Ash st. Denver, Colorado” This address does not exist, so my assumption of what it says could be incorrect.

Book submission: Mount Vernon: Washington’s Home and the Nation’s Shrine

Title: Mount Vernon: Washington’s Home and the Nation’s Shrine
Author: Wilstach, Paul
Publication date: New York, 1916
Library: Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington
Call number: E 312.5 .W743 1916
Submitted by: Samantha Snyder
Description:
This book is one of the most popular books published about Mount Vernon from the early 20th century. Inside someone has taped in pictures of their children at various locations around the estate, and written a few little anecdotes, as well as a gift statement. The two girls in the pictures are daughters of congressman Jouett Shouse, from Kansas.

Book submission: The Christian Year: Thoughts in Verse

Title: The Christian Year: Thoughts in Verse
Author: Keble, John
Publication date: New York, 1860
Library: University of South Carolina
Call number:
Submitted by: Jamie Rathjen
Description:
An 1860 edition of The Christian Year: Thoughts in Verse, originally published in 1827 by the English churchman Rev. John Keble, harbors among various examples of non-verbal marginalia two distinct references to the death of the Rev. Alexander Glennie (1804-1880), the locally eminent rector of All Saints Episcopal Church in Georgetown County, S.C. Perhaps fittingly, his death came on the evening before All Saints Day (1 November), so that both inscriptions say the same thing: “Mr Glennie called to his reward on All Saints eve 1880 at Charlott Virginia.” This is indeed a reference to Charlottesville, as no other place name in Virginia begins with “Charlotte,” but, unfortunately from a UVa point of view, what Glennie was doing in the area was limited to a trip to higher elevations for the sake of his health. In fact, this book contains the only reference I have found to his being in Charlottesville; any others, such as his cenotaph in the All Saints churchyard, only give the state. The owner of the book, who I have not been able to identify despite an owner’s inscription in the front (which has proven largely illegible), it appears need not have known Glennie personally; they could have easily been an eager parishioner, for example. Yet the nature of the verses they have selected makes it clear that they held him in high regard.

Rev. Alexander Glennie was born on 8 July 1804 in the south-east of England, yet was through his parents a full-blooded Scot. He originally became the rector of his parish in 1832, the boundaries of which were the Waccamaw River, the ocean, and the North Carolina border, leaving a narrow strip of land about 50 miles long that includes modern Myrtle Beach (Freeman). The South Carolina Historical Magazine notes “There is very little information to be obtained in regard to this Parish before 1800;” thus, perhaps it was brought to relative prominence with Glennie. His church was in the southern part of the parish, on Pawleys Island, and the current building dates from the early 20th century, but the rectory (i.e. Glennie’s house) survives from 1822. His journal, largely consisting of a list of church functions he performed in the 1850s and the people for which he performed them, and secondarily the constitution of the church’s Sunday school from the 1830s, survives and has been digitized, revealing that he ministered to both blacks and whites. While, as with almost all southern states, teaching slaves to read or write was illegal in South Carolina, apparently teaching them in religion was not, and Glennie regularly visited each of his parish’s 10 plantations in turn. In 1866, Glennie moved to the nearby Prince George Winyah episcopal church, across the river in Georgetown (Freeman). Throughout this period, he also found the time to keep voluminous observations of the weather in the area on both a monthly and daily scale from ca. 1834 until 1880, leaving an important resource for historical research into the lowcountry climate, and they formed the weather section of a local paper, the Georgetown Times and Comet, for “30 or 35 years” until shortly before his death. Yet the recordings stop in May 1880, a few months before his death. Around this period, Glennie left the area with his second wife and daughter, both named Mary, for a recuperative “trip to the mountains” in Virginia. It was on this trip, as it was later put in another local newspaper, the Georgetown Enquirer, that he was “called to his long reward.”

The Christian Year is laid out with one verse for each significant day in the religious year, starting with Advent and looping back around to All Saints’ Day and the Sundays just before Advent, with the remainder of the book being given to saints’ days and verses for events (baptisms, weddings, funerals, etc.). The poems appear to be inspired at least in part by a Bible verse presented before the text of each; they can be expanded upon Paradise Lost-style, or perhaps Keble inserts a word from the verse into the poem (for example, “hoary”). The two most substantial references to Glennie come in the second stanza of, appropriately, “All Saints’ Day,” as well as at the end of “Twenty-fifth Sunday after Trinity,” which in 1880 would have been 14 November, or two weeks after Glennie’s death. Of the two, the book’s owner could have found the latter more relevant: “Say not it dies, that glory, / ‘Tis caught unquenched on high” begins the final stanza. Yet it is the next two lines that receive a small marking next to them: “Those saint-like brows so hoary / Shall wear it in the sky.” Clearly, the book’s owner thinks Glennie worthy of high praise. In “All Saints’ Day,” it is five lines that are marked, such as “Such calm old age as conscience pure / And self-commanding hearts ensure.” It appears that any lines associating old age with wisdom, discipline, and any other generally enviable qualities have caught the owner’s eye in this section of the book.

A third reference to Glennie appears in “Nineteenth Sunday after Trinity,” where a simple “Mr. Glennie” has been written next to the next-to-last stanza. Another mention of the “Christian Pastor” has interested the owner, but with a different attitude towards the preacher: “bow’d to earth / With thankless toil, and vile esteem’d.” An accompanying set of two lines just below summarizes the pastor’s attitude: “Yet steadfast set to do his part, / And fearing most his own vain heart.” Perhaps Keble (and the book’s owner) feel sympathy for the unappreciated preacher: the verse for this poem, as well as the poem itself, is a story from Daniel about the attempted burning of three Jews in Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar. The king finds that not only were they not burned, but a fourth figure has appeared who looks “like the Son of God.” The verse and the poem, then, argue that those who righteously follow their religion can even withstand death.

Besides the book’s various markings, it also harbors an insertion of a poem by contemporary English poet Rodon Noel (1834-1894), here called “Dying” but also “The Old,” in the middle of the verse “Twentieth Sunday after Trinity.” This verse is not necessarily even about death like “Twenty-Fifth Sunday” is, rather, it takes place on top of a mountain, representing a place of contemplation. The first three of the six stanzas are devoted to the scene, and in the latter three Keble writes in the voice of God to scold a slightly lapsed would-be believer. A possible connection to “Dying” is that Noel sets a similar atmosphere of, indeed, silence and reflection. Yet two observations about the poem and its surroundings in the book indicate that perhaps it is a different sort of insertion, or came later, than all the others. The first is that there appears to be pencil lines, in the same manner as the other places in the book, under the outline indicating where the poem was placed, i.e. they seem to be obscured by the poem. The second is that as far as I can tell, “Dying” was first published only in 1892, and only in collections of Noel’s work; one such collection places it under the header of “Poems First Published in the ‘Canterbury Poets’ Series,” which was indeed in 1892, as opposed to another section indicating one of Noel’s books. Both of these point to “Dying” being a later, yet topical, insertion.

This copy of The Christian Year functions primarily as a memorial to Glennie in a variety of different ways: the written notes, the bracket-like markings picking out specific lines, and the insertion of “Dying.” As the rector of a church whose parish covered a wide area and many plantations within, Glennie need not have been personally known to the owner of the book, but the depth to which the owner was affected by Glennie’s death, as well as being practically the only source I have found for the preacher’s being in Charlottesville, suggests that perhaps he was, or at the very least that the owner was a devotee. They had possessed the book for some time: it was published in 1860 and the readable part of the inscription dates it to 1869, and it was perhaps found fitting for this purpose.

Works Cited
Buxton, Victoria Noel. The Collected Poems of Roden Noel. London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Company Limited, 1902.

Corey, Sharon Freeman. “All Saints Waccamaw Episcopal Cemetery.” Images of America: Georgetown County’s Historic Cemeteries. Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia, 2016.

Galbraith, J. E. H. “All-Saints Waccamaw. Mural Tablets and Tombstone Inscriptions.” The South Carolina Historical Magazine 13 (1912): 163-176.

Glennie, Alexander. Daily Meteorological Observations, 1863-1880. Vol. 6. Lowcountry Digital Library. .

⸺. Alexander Glennie Journal, 1831-1859. Lowcountry Digital Library.

Keble, John. The Christian Year: Thoughts in Verse. New York: James Miller, 1860.

“Alexander Glennie [Prince George].” Find A Grave, 26 June 2014. Web.

“Rev Alexander Glennie [All Saints].” Find A Grave, 10 Oct 2006. Web.

Georgetown Times and Comet. 14 Aug 1879. https://newspaperarchive.com/georgetown-times-and-comet-aug-07-1879-pageno-328071007?tag=glennie&rtserp=tags/glennie?psi=87&pci=7&ndt=by&py=1828&pey=1880&psb=date/

Georgetown Enquirer. 10 Nov 1880. https://newspaperarchive.com/georgetown-enquirer-nov-10-1880-pageno-328059927?tag=glennie&rtserp=tags/glennie?psi=87&pci=7&ndt=by&py=1828&pey=1880&psb=date/

Book submission: Carthage and the Carthaginians

Title: Carthage and the Carthaginians
Author: Smith, R. Bosworth
Publication date: London, 1916
Library: Alden Library at Ohio University
Call number: DT168 .S65 1916x
Submitted by: Casey Machenheimer
Description:
The marginalia is found on one of the front endpapers (the recto side of the frontispiece). It is signed by a previous owner, C. N. Crawford (sp?) in Rio 1919. Crawford proceeds to list four separate quotes that potentially could be from the book itself, but could also be from an outside source. However, this is unclear, since Crawford does not cite the quotes.

Book submission: La Mare au Diable

Title: La Mare au Diable
Author: George Sand
Publication date: Edinburgh, 1930
Library: D. H. Hill Library, North Carolina State University
Call number: PQ2408A10
Submitted by: Erika G.
Description:
According to the bookplate, this book came to the D. H. Hill Library via the library of Dr. George Rosen (1910-1977), a physician and professor at Columbia and Yale. However, the book’s original owner appears to be Rev. Seymour St. John (1912-2006), whose name is written in pencil on the opposite page. St. John was a longstanding and popular headmaster at the Choate School in Wallingford, CT, a school which he attended and where he was preceded as headmaster by his father. Based on the book’s publication date and the dates written on the inside cover, this copy of La Mare au Diable may have been one of St. John’s schoolbooks during his final year at Choate. It appears that one of St. John’s peers decided to tease him, because underneath the library card, someone wrote, “[Seymour St. John] is a gross procrastinator and prevoracator [sic].” St. John’s signature also appears on the back cover of the book.

Book submission: The Vision of Dante Alighieri

Title: The Vision of Dante Alighieri
Author: Translated by Rev. Henry Francis Cary
Publication date: London, 1910
Library: D.H. Hill Library at NC State
Call number: PQ4315-C37
Submitted by: Taylor Wolford
Description:
The first page of the book before the cover page is signed by a previous owner Clarence Poe and dated December 19, 1910 with the location included as Singapore. In the bottom-left hand corner, there is a publishing sticker from Methodist Publishing House Printers, Publishers, & Booksellers with the address Stamford Road Cor. Armenian Street, Singapore. There is another page in the book that includes notes and themes from the text.

Book submission: Journal of the Researches into the Natural History and Geology of the Countries Visited during the Voyage of the H.M.S. Beagle

Title: Journal of the Researches into the Natural History and Geology of the Countries Visited during the Voyage of the H.M.S. Beagle
Author: Darwin, Charles
Publication date: New York, 1880
Library: Millsaps College Library
Call number: QH11.D2
Submitted by: Students of Millsaps course – What is the Future of the Book?
Description:
This book contains lots of annotation in the margins of the text.

Book submission: The Doctrine of Salvation by Faith Proved; Or, an Answer to the Important Question, What Must I Do to Be Saved?

Title: The Doctrine of Salvation by Faith Proved; Or, an Answer to the Important Question, What Must I Do to Be Saved?
Author: Clarke, Adam
Publication date: Baltimore, 1818
Library: Millsaps College Library
Call number: BT753.C43x
Submitted by: Students of Millsaps course – What is the Future of the Book?
Description:
The first page contains an ownership inscription dated 1854, the ink of which soaks onto the next page.

Book submission: Tell-Trothes New Yeares gift … And The passionate Morrice. 1593.–John Lane’s Tom Tell-Troths message, and his pens complaint. 1600.–Thomas Powell’s Tom of all trades. Or The plaine path-way to preferment … 1631.–The glasse of Godly loue. (By John Rogers?) 1569.–

Title: Tell-Trothes New Yeares gift … And The passionate Morrice. 1593.–John Lane’s Tom Tell-Troths message, and his pens complaint. 1600.–Thomas Powell’s Tom of all trades. Or The plaine path-way to preferment … 1631.–The glasse of Godly loue. (By John Rogers?) 1569.–
Author: Furnivall, Frederick James, ed.
Publication date: London, 1876
Library: Hayden Library, Arizona State University
Call number: PR1120 .F8
Submitted by: Soren Hammerschmidt
Description:
Book prize from the New Shakespeare Society and Prof. John L. Johnson, Professor of Lang & Lit at U of Mississippi, to Charlton Henry Alexander of Kosciuscko, MS, in a copy of Tell-Trothes New Year’s Gift (London, 1876)

Book submission: D. Iunii Iuvenalis Satirae

Title: D. Iunii Iuvenalis Satirae
Author: John Delaware Lewis
Publication date: 1882, New York
Library: Van Wylen Library, Hope College
Call number: PA 6446 .A2 1882 v.1
Submitted by: Kellyanne Fitzgerald and Kaitlyn Rustemeyer
Description:
Latin and English book with marginalia from a Hope College student between 1890-1906. Contains an ad from the Holland Sentinel with identifying information that narrowed the year to 1890-1906, as well as a deposit slip from the First State Bank.

Book submission: The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare (10 volumes)

Title: The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare (10 volumes)
Author: Shakespeare, William
Publication date: London, 1879
Library: University of Virginia, Alderman Library
Call number: PR2753 .S6 1879 v.1-10
Submitted by: Maggie Whalen
Description:
In the weeks following our post on the UVA Library Collection’s many literary treasures tied to Albemarle County’s historic Rives family, UVA community members brought to our attention a few other Rives-owned and -annotated volumes worth investigating.

Our next subject: The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, a ten-volume set published in London in 1879.

UVA-administered bookplates reveal that the set came to the UVA Library Collection through the books of one Roberta Welford (1873-1956), a women’s rights advocate and suffragist whose papers are preserved in UVA’s Special Collections Library. Personal bookplates indicate that the set was previously owned by Amélie Rives Troubetzkoy (1863-1945), the niece of aforementioned Amélie Louise and Ella, the daughter of Alfred.

In our first post, we discussed at length another tome of Shakespeare owned and annotated by the second, and most famous, Amélie. That text, a hefty volume entitled The Plays of William Shakespeare, was published in London in 1823. It contains two inscriptions by Amélie, one from 1885 and another from 1890, as well as a number of marginal annotations. Two Gentlemen of Verona, Much Ado About Nothing, Taming of the Shrew, and All’s Well That Ends Well are among the plays most thoroughly marked in this previously discussed text.

Considering the substantial overlap in content between these two collections, it’s somewhat surprising that Amélie owned, let alone read and marked, both.

And yet, Amélie’s The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare is similarly rich with annotations. Of the ten volumes to the set, I was able to examine nine (volume 6 was missing) and found some degree of user modification in each.

Oddly enough, volumes 7 through 10 are the only texts that feature user inscriptions. All read: “Amélie Rives / 1881 / Castle Hill,” indicating that Amélie acquired this set four years prior to her bulkier edition of Plays.

A number of other dates crop up throughout Dramatic Works, particularly on plays’ title pages, revealing that Amélie returned to this text many times throughout her life. She records, for example, that she read Taming of the Shrew “for the first time in this edition the evening of” December 29, 1896; Love’s Labour’s Lost for the “2nd time” on the same night; and “reread” The Tempest on January 23, 1932.

These annotations recall a note Amélie makes in her copy of Plays, in which she records that she read The Tempest, perhaps for the first time, in 1900 at her family’s estate, Castle Hill.

The pages of Amélie’s Dramatic Works are thoroughly underscored and bracketed. Her marginal annotations frequently mention her daily life in Virginia and occasionally reference her own writings.

Annotations in The Tempest. In the first image, she marginally defines “kybe” as a “chilblain.” In the second, she underscores “homely” and writes: “NB Homely used here as we Virginians use it now!!”

Annotations in Love’s Labour’s Lost. In the first image, Amélie emphatically brackets and underscores a footnote about a famous bay horse named Morocco and writes: “NB Splendid subject for a poem or story!!” Second: she underscores “canary” (a popular dance in Shakespeare’s time) and writes in the margins: “NB Can this be the origin of the Negro ‘pull Cary’?” Third: a marginal note: “NB 25th Aug 1895.” Fourth: some dense underscoring.

Annotations in Troilus and Cressida. Amélie underscores “placket” and writes: “Modern American i.e. ‘Skirt.’”

Annotations in King Lear. She responds to Shakespeare’s use of “nuncle” (defined in the footnotes as “a familiar contraction of mine uncle”), and writes in the margins: “And in Virginia we always address old Negros as ‘Uncle’ + ‘Aunt’ — 1892.”

Annotations in the Preliminary Remarks to Macbeth. Amélie underlines and brackets this passage heavily. She writes extensive, barely legible, notes in the margins. At the bottom of the page, she underscores the name of the author and writes of his book of lectures: “Get at once if possible! ’92.”

On the final endpapers of several volumes, Amélie collects her favorite lines, passages, phrases, and ideas.

On the rear endleaf of volume 1, Amélie records the following line from The Tempest: “The red plague rid you for learning me your language. Page 214.”

In the final pages of volume 5, Amélie records a series of “Notes” and corresponding “Page” numbers from The First Part of King Henry IV and King Henry V. One note reads: “The lady Ermengare. (Ermengare is a beautiful name.)” On the next page, Amélie transcribes an exchange between Prince Harry and Pions from The Second Part of King Henry IV. The page, however, is torn.

And for that reason, perhaps, she transcribes the passage again on the book’s front endpaper.

On a rear endpaper in volume 7, she copies the following line from Troilus and Cressida: “‘This I presume will wake him’–Page 198.”

In volume 9, she notes perceived “Repetitions of Shakespeare:” “In Hamlet, ‘Himself the primrose way of dalliance treads.’ In Macbeth, ‘that go the primrose way to the everlasting fire.’”

Finally, in volume 10, she writes: “Othello ‘Goats + Monkeys!’ see page 119.” On the corresponding page, Amélie has written “NB” beside the line: “You are welcome, sir, to Cyprus.–Goats, and monkeys!” At the bottom of the page, she brackets a footnote that explains the “great art” of the line.

Perhaps most intriguing among Amélie’s many annotations are those that speficially reference her writing process. In Plays, Amélie marks a line from All’s Well That Ends Well (“So there’s my riddle, One, that’s dead, is quick”), which corresponds to the title of her most famous novel (The Quick or the Dead?). In Dramatic Works, she reads the story of a legendary horse and notes that it would be a “splendid subject for a poem or story!!” Bearing these instances in mind, the endleaf lists explored above read almost like condensed catalogs of potential literary inspiration.

From Judith Page Rives’s The Living Female Writers of the South, to her daughter’s Oeuvres de Boileau, to her granddaughter’s various collections of Shakespeare’s plays, evidence of the Rives women reading with pencils in hand spans three generations and at least 80 years. Though the Rives women are remembered first and foremost as prolific writers, their active engagement with these texts reveals that they were also ambitious readers. As is demonstrated by this post and the last, the UVA Library Collection is dense with examples of the Rives family’s involvement with literature, both public and personal in nature.

Sources
Boileau Despréaux, Nicolas, and Charles Augustin Sainte-Beuve. Oeuvres : Avec Notes Et Imitations Des Auteurs Anciens. Paris: Furne, 1853.
Brown, Alexander, et al. Papers of the Rives, Sears and Rhinelander Families.
Encyclopædia Britannica Inc., 2016. Web. 18 Mar. 2016.
Hall, Fitzedward, et al. Letters of the Rives Family. .
“Nicolas Boileau”. Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online.
Papers of Roberta Wellford, Accession #6090, Special Collections Dept., University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.
Rives Family Papers Compiled by Elizabeth Langhorne, 1839-1990, #10596-d, Albert H. and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.
Rives, James Childs. Reliques of the Rives (Ryves). Lynchburg, Va.: J. P. Bell Co., 1929.
Shakespeare, William, and Samuel Weller Singer. The Dramatic Works. 3rd ed. rev. London: G. Bell, 1879.
Shakespeare, William, et al. The Plays of William Shakespeare. New ed. London: Printed for F. C. and J. Rivington; [etc., etc.], 1823.

For more on Book Traces @ U.Va., visit our blog at https://booktraces.library.virginia.edu .

Book submission: Zóphiël, or, the Bride of Seven

Title: Zóphiël, or, the Bride of Seven
Author: del Occidente, Maria
Publication date: Boston, 1834
Library: University of Virginia, Alderman Library
Call number: PS1123 .B86 Z4 1834
Submitted by: Maggie Whalen
Description:
The Book Traces @ UVA team recently happened upon this 1834 edition of Maria del Occidente’s Zóphiël, or, the Bride of Seven in the UVA Library Collection.

The book’s marbled cover is tattered and nearly detached from its contents. The condition of its interior is not much better: the pages are stained, splotchy, and brittle. That the volume appears so loved and worn, though, only adds to the intrigue of its most curious features: its previous owners’ inscriptions and insertions.

The inner cover contains a bookplate, revealing that the text came to UVA by way of one E. R. Reynolds.

Opposite is the front endpaper, which features two inscriptions.

The first, and fainter, reads: “With the respects of / Horace Brooks / 2 – Arty – –.”

Below is a second inscription: “Gen. Horace Brooks, the above written, was the only son of the poet who has been styled ‘The Female Poe.’ He was appointed to West Point through the influence of Gen. LaFayette. His portrait was presented to me about two years ago. / E. R. Reynolds / Oct 27 / 99.”

Taped opposite the book’s title page one finds the portrait of Horace Brooks to which E. R. Reynolds just alluded. The backside of the photograph is labeled “Horace Brooks.” A postage stamp and street address, “Chev – E. R. – Reynolds – / 813 Capital St / Washington / DC,” indicate that Reynolds received the portrait at his home by mail. The postal mark reveals that the portrait/postcard originated from New York.

The portrait, which captures the profile of an elderly Brooks, was evidently taken at Quartley’s, a Baltimore photo gallery. Just above the business’s name and address is a New York return address. It reads: “If not called for return / to H. – Brooks – No – 238 –East 34th / New York City – –.” What Reynolds fails to mention in his inscription is that this portrait was “presented” to him by its subject, Horace Brooks.

Taken together, these names, dates, and locations hint at some greater narrative. Understanding the particular significance of this volume, though, requires answering a few of the many questions its inscriptions and insertions provoke.

First: Who was this E. R. Reynolds?

Biographies of Chevalier Elmer Robert Reynolds (1846-1907) describe him as a man of diverse interests and life experiences. Reynolds spent his late teenage years fighting for the Union with the Wisconsin Light Infantry. He later studied at Columbian University (now George Washington University) in Washington, D.C. He went on to serve for some twenty years in the United States Civil Service as an examiner of pensions. Reynolds’s biographies, however, remember him chiefly for his work as an ethnologist and botanist. His studies focused primarily on American Indian antiquities in Maryland and Virginia. Titles of his scholarly writings include, for example, “Aboriginal Soapstone Quarries in the District of Columbia,” “Pre-Columbian Shell Mounds at Newburg, MD,” and “Prehistoric Remains in the Valleys of the Potomac and the Shenandoah.” His work won him recognition nationally by the Smithsonian Institution, Peabody Museum of American Archaeology, and Harvard University, as well as abroad. In 1887, King Humbert of Italy knighted him Chevalier and Knight Companion of the Royal Order of Italy.

Biographical accounts of Chevalier Reynolds, which appear in encyclopedias, anthropological society registries, and newspapers, characterize him by his public positions: as a veteran, a public servant, a celebrated scientist. Reynolds’s extracurricular interests, namely his fascination with Edgar Allan Poe, go entirely unmentioned.

A tactful search through UVA’s Special Collections Library reveals that Reynolds possessed more than a slight interest in the University’s most famous dropout. Reynolds donated a number of works by Poe and scholarly treatments of Poe to the University of Virginia, many of which are now held in Special Collections.

Several books in Reynolds’s collection of Poe, including The Bells and The Conchologist’s First Book, are bound in the same marbled paper and tagged with the same adhesive label as his copy of Zöphiél.

A note on the front endpaper of The Conchologist’s First Book reads: “Excessively rare.”

This copy of Joyce’s Edgar Allan Poe features a presentation inscription from Reynolds to the Poe Alcove through James A. Harrison.

This copy of Moran’s A Defense of Edgar Allan Poe includes a program and ticket for the author’s lecture on the life and character of Poe, as well as two distinct presentation inscriptions. The second inscription is from Reynolds to J. H. Ingram.

The Special Collections Library also contains extensive correspondence between Reynolds and various Poe scholars, including John Henry Ingram, Poe’s most famous biographer, and Charles William Kent, UVA English Professor and president of the Poe Memorial Association, of which Reynolds was a member.

That specific mention of Reynolds’s interest in Poe does not appear in his biographies (of which there are many) suggests that it was more a hobby than a serious, scholarly endeavor. He is credited, however, with contributing material to a 1902 edition of The Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe, edited by University of Virginia Professor James A. Harrison.

With this background on Reynolds in mind, we move to the next question: Why did Chevalier Reynolds care about Horace Brooks’s copy of Zóphiël?

Reynolds hints at the answer in his inscription on the book’s front endpaper. The book’s original owner, he explains, was Horace Brooks (1814-1894), the son of its author, Maria Brooks, who wrote under the pseudonym Maria del Occidente. This edition of Zöphiél was published in 1834, at which point Horace Brooks was studying at West Point (1831-1835). As Reynolds notes, Horace was appointed to West Point “through the influence of” General Lafayette, who was apparently quite taken with his mother. An account of Maria Brooks and General Lafayette’s first meeting appears in the 1916 Medford Historical Record:

Like a gallant Frenchman, Lafayette was susceptible to feminine charms, and so pleased was he with Mrs. Brooks that he was eager to befriend her, and learning that she desired for her son an appointment to a United States military academy, he procured it for her, a favor which she had been unable to attain (9).

Horace signs the book “2 – Arty –,” suggesting that it came into his possession during his service as a second lieutenant with the 2nd United States Artillery Regiment in the Second Seminole War, between 1836 and 1838.

The most striking moment in Reynolds’s note is, of course, his comment that the book’s author, Maria Brooks, had been “styled ‘The Female Poe.’

Which brings us to our next set of questions: Who was Maria Brooks? And how was she connected to Edgar Allan Poe?

Maria Gowen Brooks (1794-1845) was an American poet best known for Zöphiél, a book of poems based on the story of Sara in the Book of Tobit. Brooks’s biography is marked by episodes of explosive literary productivity, a succession of tragic losses, and extensive periods of travel abroad. At the age of 13, her father died and she became the ward, and shortly thereafter the wife, of her sister’s widower, John Brooks. Indeed, at age 16, Maria wed John, who was 30 years her senior. During their tumultuous marriage, Maria began writing poetry, composing her first poem at age 19. A year later, her only son, Horace, was born. John died in 1823, at which point Maria moved to her brother’s coffee plantation in Cuba. There, she wrote Zöphiél, or, the Bride of Seven. In 1825, she published the first canto of Zöphiél, which caught the attention of English Poet Laureate, Robert Southey. In their correspondence, Southey praised Brooks’s work and gave her the pseudonym “Maria del Occidente.” In 1829, Brooks completed Zöphiél. The work was published in its entirety in London in 1831 and in Boston in 1834. Following the book’s American debut, Brooks captured the interest of another prominent literary figure, this time stateside: Edgar Allan Poe.

Throughout the 1840s, Maria Brooks’s name, and pseudonym, crops up frequently in Poe’s reviews of other female poets. Amelia Welby, he writes, “has nearly all the imagination of Maria del Occidente…” (The Works 203). Elizabeth Oakes Smith’s The Sinless Child is “undoubtedly…one of the most original of American poems—surpassed in this respect, we think, only by Maria del Occidente’s ‘Bride of Seven’” (The Works 129). Frances Sargent Osgood “has occasional passages of true imagination – but scarcely the glowing, vigorous, and sustained ideality of Mrs. Maria Brooks…” (The Works 98). Estelle Anna Lewis’s “The Broken Heart” “is more enthusiastic, more glowing, more passionate, and perhaps more abundant in that peculiar spirit of abandon which has rendered Mrs. Maria Brooks’s ‘Zophiel’ so great a favorite with the critics” (The Works 948).

Literary critic Kirsten Silva Gruesz observes that although Poe “compares nearly every woman poet about whom he wrote to Maria del Occidente,” he never devotes a separate review to her works (77). In a 2008 article, “Maria Gowen Brooks, In and Out of the Poe Circle,” Gruesz quotes Thomas Ollive Mabbott, the only other critic to have previously commented upon “Poe’s apparent interest in Brooks” (95). Mabbott writes: “his references during 1848 and 1849 make me think he was studying her poetry, and had he lived, might have produced a critique upon it” (95). Poe, however, died in 1849.

(Regarding Poe’s death I feel compelled to remark: Legend has it that on his deathbed, Poe called the name “Reynolds” repeatedly. Most Poe scholars doubt the veracity of this myth, but for those who might still be wondering, our Chevalier Reynolds was only three years old at the time.)

Poe’s repeated reference to Brooks in the above-quoted reviews appear to be the most solid connection between the two poets. Indeed, I was unable to find specific mention of Brooks as “The Female Poe,” as Chevalier Reynolds indicates she had been “styled.” Although their relationship is ultimately “unknowable,” Gruesz speculates at length about possible connections between the two writers. She notes, for example, that both Brooks and Poe were included in Samuel Kettell’s 1829 anthology Specimens of American Poetry, which “the young Poe almost certainly got his hands on…as it contained the first critical notice of Tamerlane” (96). Gruesz continues: “Might not the anecdote Kettell told about Brooks—that she took the idea for a poem about a beautiful angel named Zóphiël from her reading in apocryphal literature—have echoed in Poe’s head as he imagined a similar character, Israfel, in a poem first published in 1831?” (96).

Slightly loftier, but intriguing nonetheless, is the eerie overlap in the two figures’ biographies, which Gruesz also highlights: “…a dubiously incestuous marriage involving a teenaged bride; an interest in the esoteric, the ‘curious,’ and the otherworldly; an association with a slaveholding economy; even their experience at West Point, a place that served the literary aspirations of each in different ways” (95).

This copy of Zöphiél raises far more questions than I am able to answer. (For example: What was the nature of the relationship and correspondence between Horace Brooks and Chevalier Reynolds? How did this volume come into Reynolds’s possession? What exactly prompted Reynolds to describe Maria Brooks as “The Female Poe”? Was the “Reynolds,” for whom Poe may or may not have called before his death, related to our Chevalier?) It is nonetheless quite clear that Horace Brooks’s book, inscription, and portrait contribute to Chevalier Reynolds’s collection of materials connected, if tangentially, to his favorite author.

For more on Book Traces @ UVA, visit our blog at https://booktraces.library.virginia.edu .

Sources
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. Vol. 17. N.p.: A.L. Hummel, 1901. 82. Google Books. Google. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.
Center of Military History. United States Army, 12 Nov. 2015. Web. 18 Feb. 2016.
The Complete Works of Edgar Allan Poe. Vol. 1. N.p.: T.Y. Crowell, 1902. Xix. Google Books. Google. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.
Correspondence of the Poe Memorial Association, Accession #38-406, Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.
Find A Grave Memorial. N.p., 16 Oct. 2010. Web. 18 Feb. 2016.
Gruesz, Kirsten Silva. “Maria Gowen Brooks, In and Out of the Poe Circle.” ESQ: A Journal of the American Renaissance 54.1 (2008): 75-110. Project MUSE. Web. 18 Feb. 2016.
Holsinger Studio Collection, ca. 1890-1938. Acession #9862, Special Collections, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.
Interments in the Historic Congressional Cemetery. Bytes of History, 13 Aug. 2006. Web. 18 Feb. 2016.
John Henry Ingram’s Poe Collection, Accession #38-135, Special Collections Dept., University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.
Joyce, John A. Edgar Allan Poe. New York: F.Tennyson Neely Co, 1901.
The Medford Historical Register. Vol. 19-20. N.p.: Society, 1916. 9-16. Print.
Moran, John J. A Defense of Edgar Allan Poe: Life, Character and Dying Declarations of the Poet. An Official Account of His Death. Washington, D.C.: William F. Boogher, 1885.
The Naturalists’ Universal Directory. N.p.: Cassino, 1882. 187. Google Books. Google. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.
New Century Reference Library of the World’s Most Important Knowledge:. Vol. 4. N.p.: Syndicate Pub., 1909. Google Books. Google. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.
Poe, Edgar Allan. Arthur Gordon Pym: Or, Shipwreck, Mutiny, and Famine: Being the Extraordinary Adventures of Arthur Gordon Pym, Mariner, of Nantucket, North America, During a Voyage to the South Seas, and His Various Discoveries In the Eighty-fourth Parallel of Southern Latitude. London: Published by John Cunningham, Crown-court, Fleet-street, 1841.
Poe, Edgar Allan, and Thomas Brown. The Conchologist’s First Book: a System of Testaceous Malacology, Arranged Expressly for the Use of Schools, In Which the Animals, According to Cuvier, Are Given with the Shells, a Great Number of New Species Added, and the Whole Brought Up, As Accurately As Possible, to the Present Condition of the Science. 2d ed. With illus. of 215 shells, presenting a correct type of each given. Philadelphia: Haswell, Barrington, and Haswell, 1840.
Poe, Edgar Allan. The Bells. Philadelphia: Scattergood, 1872.
Prehistoric Cultures of the Delmarva Peninsula: An Archaeological Study. Newark: U of Delaware, 1989. 65. Google Books. Google. Web. 18 Feb. 2016.
“Reynolds, Elmer Robert.” Who’s Who in America. Ed. John W. Leonard. Chicago: A. N. Marquis, 1906. 1480-481. Google Books. Google. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.
The United States Army and Navy Journal and Gazette of the Regular and Volunteer Forces. Vol. 29. N.p.: Army and Navy Journal Incorporated, 1891. 658. Google Books. Google, 18 Dec. 2013. Web. 18 Feb. 2016.
U.Va. prints and photographs file, Accession #RG-30/1/10/011, Prints0000, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.
Wilson, Woodrow. “Reynolds, Elmer Roberts.” Harper’s Encyclopædia of United States History from 458 A. D. to 1906. By Benson Johns Lossing. N.p.: Harper & Brothers, 1907. 423. Google Books. Google. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.
The Works of Edgar Allan Poe. N.p.: Stone & Kimball, 1896. Google Books. Google, 6 Mar. 2010. Web. 18 Feb. 2016.

Book submission: The plays of William Shakespeare

Title: The plays of William Shakespeare
Author: Shakespeare, William
Publication date: London, 1823
Library: University of Virginia, Alderman Library
Call number: PR2752 .S8 1823
Submitted by: Maggie Whalen
Description:
Judith Rives was not the only writer in her family. In the later years of his life, her husband, William Cabell Rives, wrote biographies of John Hampden and James Madison, both of which are available in the UVA Library circulating collection. Their daughter, Amélie Louise Rives Sigourney (1832-1873) also dabbled in writing, penning but never publishing a number of poems and stories before her death.

The most notable writer among the Riveses, though, was surely Judith’s granddaughter and Amélie Rives Sigourney’s niece, Amélie Rives Troubetzkoy (1863-1945). Goddaughter of Robert E. Lee and eventual heiress of the Castle Hill estate, Amélie ran in the same circles of Albemarle society as her grandmother had. Unlike her grandmother, though, Amélie’s celebrity was not only local, but national. Amélie’s fame was due in large part to her first novel, The Quick or the Dead? (1888), which was an immediate sensation. The book, which dared to depict women as sexually aware, was “reviled by critics and clergymen across the country,” but nonetheless sold 300,000 copies (Lucey). Amélie proceeded to publish at least 24 volumes of fiction, a number of uncollected poems, and a play. According to Censer, Amélie was part of a small group of southern female authors who in their works “presented southern women who were intellectually astute and domestically skilled. Their heroines neither sought nor enjoyed belledom but instead searched for fulfilling, useful lives” (8). Amélie, in particular, experimented with gender conventions and on occasion confronted the more difficult topics of race and class (Censer 8).

The UVA Library Collection contains a number of books associated with Amélie Rives Troubetzkoy, including those written by her and others owned by her. This copy of Barbara Dering, Amélie’s 1893 sequel to The Quick or the Dead?, is thoroughly marked, featuring the inscriptions of at least two distinct owners and marginalia throughout.

The circulating collection also contains a thick copy of Shakespeare’s plays, formerly owned and heavily annotated by Amélie Rives Troubetzkoy herself.

Amélie inscribed the volume with her name multiple times. The first example appears on the front endpaper and reads: “Amélie L. Rives / Castle – Hill / 15th of March – 1885.” At the time of this initial inscription, Amélie was just 22-years-old, still three years from publishing The Quick or the Dead?.

A second inscription appears on the title page of The Tempest. Here, Amélie has inscribed her name twice, first with her maiden name, “Rives,” and a second time with her married name, “Troubetzkoy.” The names are accompanied by a date: “18th June 1900.” At the time of this inscription, Amélie was 37-years-old and had published a number of novels. Though she had married the noble but impoverished Pierre Troubetzkoy four years prior to this inscription, Amélie continued to publish her literary works under her maiden name, perhaps explaining the double signature.

Many passages of the plays that follow are bracketed, check-marked, and underscored.

Amélie has also left several notes throughout the volume. In The Gentleman of Verona, for instance, Amélie stars and brackets several lines of text at the end of Scene I and writes at the bottom of the page: “Same idea exposed several times in Tempest by Gonzalez.”

Later, in Much Ado About Nothing, she notes: “In Shakespeare’s time ‘ache’ was pronounced ‘H’ – AR.”

In the margins of Taming of the Shrew, she seems to make a wry joke about husbands, marking the line: “A husband! a devil!” and writing at the bottom of the page: “The book opened here of itself just as I had said laughingly ‘O gin I had a husband!’” According to the Oxford English Dictionary’s definition of “gin,” this exclamation might translate roughly to “If only I had a husband.”

Perhaps the most intriguing of Amélie’s annotations appears in All’s Well That Ends Well. Here, Amélie marks an “X” beside the line: “So there’s my riddle, One, that’s dead, is quick,” and writes below: “The book also opened here just as I was trying to find another title as good as The Quick or the Dead. 23 Nov. 1888.” In this moment, we witness an intimate memorialization: Amélie marks in her copy of Shakespeare’s plays the phrase that inspired the title of her most famous literary work, published just half a year prior in April 1888.

From Judith Rives’s humble response upon finding her name in Female Writers of the South to her granddaughter Amélie Rives’s remarks and reminiscences upon Shakespeare, it is clear that the UVA Library Collection contains an array of Rives family literary treasures, not only those printed by press but also those marked by hand.

For further examples of volumes owned/annotated by members of the Rives family, see the related post on Judith Paige Rives’s copy of The Living Female Writers of the South.

For more on Book Traces @ UVA, visit our blog at https://booktraces.library.virginia.edu .

Sources
“The Cabell Family.” Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library. University of Virginia Library, n.d. Web. 27 Jan. 2016.
Censer, Jane Turner. The Reconstruction of White Southern Womanhood, 1865-1895. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 2003. Google Books. Google. Web. 27 Jan. 2016.
Hatch, Peter J. “The Garden and Its People.” “A Rich Spot of Earth”: Thomas Jefferson’s Revolutionary Garden at Monticello. N.p.: Yale UP, 2012. 33. Google Books. Google. Web. 27 Jan. 2016.
Lay, K. Edward. “The Georgian Period.” The Architecture of Jefferson Country: Charlottesville and Albemarle County, Virginia. Charlottesville: U of Virginia, 2000. 60-61. Google Books. Google. Web. 27 Jan. 2016.
Lucey, Donna M. “Patron’s Choice: Sex, Celebrity and Scandal in the Amélie Rives Chanler Troubetzkoy Papers.” Notes from Under Grounds. University of Virginia Library: Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections, 23 Aug. 2013. Web. 27 Jan. 2016.
Prose, Francine. “Lifestyles of the Rich and Infamous”. The Washington Post. Web. 30 Jul, 2006.
Rives, Amélie. Barbara Dering. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott company, 1893.
Shakespeare, William, et al. The Plays of William Shakespeare. New ed. London: Printed for F. C. and J. Rivington; [etc., etc.], 1823.
Tardy, Mary T. The Living Female Writers of the South. Philadelphia: Claxton, Remsen & Haffelfinger, 1872.
Varon, Elizabeth R. “We Mean to Be Counted”: White Women and Politics in Antebellum Virginia. N.p.: U of North Carolina, 2000. Google Books. Google. Web. 27 Jan. 2016.
Weeks, Lyman Horace. “George Lockhart Rives.” Prominent Families of New York. New York: Historical, 1897. 478. Google Books. Google. Web. 27 Jan. 2016.